The Rouge River.

verdant |ˈvərdnt| adjective (of countryside) green with grass or other rich vegetation. • of the bright green color of lush grass : a deep, verdant green.

Every time I  head to oregon I am quickly reminded of its beauty, verdancy and abundance of generally nice people.

This trip was no exception, and what a trip it was. It was a good thing that we were packed to go rafting, having all the drybags and wet weather gear really came in handy when it decided to rain for days on end.

Devon and the OneUp enjoying the only sun on the trip.

When it comes to gear testing there was no better time to be on the river. The OneUp was a great asset when it came to hanging up all that wet gear from the internal guy lines, and the roll back floor allowed the water to drip right back on to the sand.

As usual everywhere we go people want to know.. What is that structure? We got asked that question buy just about every group that passed us, but this one fellow asked us for our website and I hollered SLINGFIN.COM! I was sure he didn’t hear me as he rushed down river, but sure enough a few days later this picture popped up in our inbox.. As it turns out his name was Steve Roelof, and on top of having great hearing, he takes stunning river shots & has a site called http://www.westernriverimages.com/ it is filled with beautiful pics.

Prototype development on Mt.Rainier.

Michael Horst is a mountaineer who has recently added a page to mountaineering history.

This past May he summited Everest and Lhotse in 21 hours, making him the first human to accomplish such a feat.  He was followed by another team of climbers led by Garett Madison, who were using the L.F.D on their expedition.

Being a good friend of SlingFin and with his recent accomplishments, we offered Michael a prototype of a tent we are developing called the Hardshell.

The Hardshell is the smallest of our alpine tent line designed to be pushed up high on the mountain and shelter 3-4 climbers and gear. Built around the Webtruss the Hardshell has all the advantages of the OneUp in a smaller lighter package and a full pole supported vestibule.

Michael got the Hardshell to 11,000ft at Ingraham Flats on Mt.Rainier and came back with great reviews and some stunning photos. This little fortress is in the final stages of development and with its recent performance in the field, we are certain it will be a driving force as strong as those it was designed to withstand.

We are also working on a few other models and if you look closely at the album on Facebook you may be able to spot them…

Tell me what you find and ill send you a sticker!

Happy Trails.

=D

 

OneUp on Rainier

 

 

 

 

The OneUp on a bluebird day. Mt. Rainier.

While the SlingFin crew was going through the paces on the “river of no return“…

The OneUp was getting put through the paces on Mt. Rainier.

One of the main goals of SlingFin is to produce the best gear possible with inferred design principals from real users, guides, and outdoor professionals.

The best way to do this is simple. Get the gear to the mountain and into a guides pack… Then tell them to beat it up.

The guides using the tents had some great responses to the design of the tent, and some even better ideas and feedback!

Yet another photo of a big mountain where all the tents in view were designed by Martin Zemitis.

MOUNTAIN TRIP IS ON TOP OF THE WORLD!

Ephi just waiting to get into his tent

Thanks to the strong and experienced guides at Mountain Trip, they had a 100% summit success!

All the comforts of home in our big dome! Laurie brings sushi to base camp.

 

And what from what i’ve seen from the crew so far, this group does it right. Sushi at base camp? Labatts beer at Camp 3 @24,500ft ?  Days of extras oxygen at Camp 4? Sounds like Mountain Trip pulls out all the stops for their clients, add to that guides like Scott Woolums and Bill Allen who have spent more nights in the back country than an alaskan bear cub, and you have a recipe for a solid expedition team.

The OneUp: Not just for Everest.

Jim praising the waterfall

This past Weekend I had the chance to take a OneUp out to Point Reyes for a short backpacking trip with some friends. We hiked out to Wildcat camp which just happens to sit on a two mile unspoiled beach with a waterfall that shoots off the cliffs in to the ocean.

The OneUP at Wildcat Camp 6, Point Reyes Califorina

OneUp with Floor, Inner tent and Fly in place. Look at the tension! You could bounce a quarter off that fly!

OneUp with the fly rolled back for airflow and shade.

 

This structure never fails to impress me, every time I take it on a trip The OneUp gives me another reason I should  sell all my other tents and stop waisting time thinking about what  to bring on my next trek. This is the most versatile shelter I have ever inhabited. The OneUp adapts to the surrounding environment allowing you to actually occupy your tent during the heat of the day.

The fact that the Webtruss is a totally independent structure is what sets The OneUp apart from every other tent on the market.  The main goal of this structure is to be super versatile, think of the Webtruss as an exoskeleton that can adapt to your needs. 

Say it’s raining and your group needs a place to eat: Just stretch the fly over the frame and bingo you have a massive “single wall” floorless tent that will fit 5 people with room to spare! When you are done just reattach the inner tent body and you have a fully enclosed double wall bomb shelter, with two huge freestanding vestibules.

=D

 

First Image of the One Up on Everest!

Today is a big day for us. The first images of the OneUp nestled in on Everest at 19,800 ft  have come in courtesy of Garrett Madison. The wind has been howling up there pushing gusts of +60 knots over night. Garett and two other guides spent the night in the OneUp with the inner body set up for warmth and extra protection. Reports were that the vent system works great in high winds, allowing for minute changes in the zipper apex in order to control spindrift and airflow. The crew at AAI have been putting the SlingFin systems to the test in some of  the harshest conditions anywhere on earth. We gave Garett a custom Easton Carbon Fiber pole set for this expedition, shaving almost a pound off the total weight of the tent.

We are very happy to provide this level of high-end gear supply to guide services on Everest. We see it as a mutuality beneficial relationship. They get a supply of what may be the finest expedition shelters ever made, and in return they get to beat the living bejezzus out of it, and come back with advice and design ideas that are impossible to test under average conditions.

THE ONEUP IN CAMP 1. LOTSE, NUPTSE AND THE WEST SHOULDER OF EVEREST IN THE BACKGROUND

=D

Everest and Lhotse in 24 hours!

The gang over at Alpine Ascents International have set out on a truly epic mission. If I told you that I was plannining on climbing to the summit of the tallest mountain in the world, heading back to camp 4 resting for a bit, and then continuing on to the summit of the 4th highest peak, you would say I was crazy.

And you would be right.

But when a well rounded and fully pollished mountain guide like Garrett Madison takes on such a challenge, people sit up and take notice and a very select few raise their hands and get in line.

This is a quote from Garrett’s totally awesome blog:

We will begin our trek up the Khumbu Valley at the end of March, and reach Everest Base Camp around mid April.  We will train at base camp reviewing our technical climbing skills for about a week, then make our first trip up the mountain.  Our first “rotation” will include climbing through the Khumbu Icefall to Camp 1 where we will spend a few nights, then on to Camp 2 for a few nights, then back to Base Camp where we will rest & recover.  We will then head up for our second “rotation” where we plan to climb to camps 1, 2, then 3 and spend a night at 3, then back to Base Camp.  Usually at this time we drop down valley a few nights to rest and recover where the air is thicker.  After a few days rest we head back up to Everest Base Camp.  Our third “rotation” will include an attempt at the summit of Everest, and for some of our climbers, an attempt at Lhotse (4th highest mountain) as well.
The plan for our “third” rotation is to climb to Camps 1,2,3, then 4.  After reaching the South Col high camp (Camp 4), we will rest 24 hours then depart in the evening with the expectation of reaching Everest’s summit the next morning.  We then plan to return to our high camp around noon that day.  The climbers who are planning to attempt Lhotse will rest that afternoon & evening, then depart late that night and descend from the South Col to Lhotse high camp, where they will hopefully ascend the prominent couloir to the summit of Lhotse sometime that morning, then descend down to Camp 2.  The other climbers who have climbed Everest but who are not attempting Lhotse will descend that day to Camp 2 as well (after sleeping that night at the South Col high camp).
Recap:  We hope to safely climb to the summit of Mt. Everest, and then a few of our climbers will try to reach the summit of Lhotse (4th highest mountain) about 24 hours later.  We have made preparations & will continue to stay focused to maximize our chances of success for this “Peak to Peak” adventure.  As always, safety is our number 1 priority! “.
-Garrett Madison Expedition Leader.
I have to admit that I’m alittle addicited to garretts blog. It’s great!
He has a google earth plugin with the whole route mapped, altitude tracker and good photography.
We have a tremendous amount of faith in the ability of this team to carry out this mission in a safe and efficient manner. We wish them the best!
=D

R&D in Chimborazo, Ecuador

Robert Link founder of Mountain Link,  just got back from Ecuador. He was given the task of running a prototype One Up through its paces on Chimborazo, the country’s highest peak, and if anybody can do that its Robert!

look at those vestibules!

He came back with nothing but rave reviews and some stellar ideas for improvements to the snow-skirt and guy-out system.