The L.F.D on Broad Peak.

The Altituide Junkies crew have returned from an expedition to Broad Peak.

From the Altitude Junkies blog:

“We have now finally arrived in Base Camp after six long days trekking and will be enjoying some well deserved rest over the next few days while we establish our base camp.

 

For this Broad Peak expedition we are very pleased to be using the LFD dome made by SlingFin as our dinning and communication tent. The guys behind SlingFin, Martin and Tim, are two of the original guys who started Mountain Hardwear so we expect them to be knocking out some awesome tents in the future with the SlingFin product line.

 

After we have base camp established with all our communication and solar equipment set up we will then make plans to start to fix rope to camp one and get some acclimatization rotations in.

 

The above photos show the view of K2 from Broad Peak base camp and our members enjoying lunch in our SlingFin dining dome.

 

-Phil Crampton”

Phil is a well seasoned mountain guide who really knows his stuff, his insights and comments from the field are invaluable to us back at our own base camp in Berkeley.

Thanks for the kudos Phil! We hope to get your team in a B.F.D for the next expedition.

Prototype development on Mt.Rainier.

Michael Horst is a mountaineer who has recently added a page to mountaineering history.

This past May he summited Everest and Lhotse in 21 hours, making him the first human to accomplish such a feat.  He was followed by another team of climbers led by Garett Madison, who were using the L.F.D on their expedition.

Being a good friend of SlingFin and with his recent accomplishments, we offered Michael a prototype of a tent we are developing called the Hardshell.

The Hardshell is the smallest of our alpine tent line designed to be pushed up high on the mountain and shelter 3-4 climbers and gear. Built around the Webtruss the Hardshell has all the advantages of the OneUp in a smaller lighter package and a full pole supported vestibule.

Michael got the Hardshell to 11,000ft at Ingraham Flats on Mt.Rainier and came back with great reviews and some stunning photos. This little fortress is in the final stages of development and with its recent performance in the field, we are certain it will be a driving force as strong as those it was designed to withstand.

We are also working on a few other models and if you look closely at the album on Facebook you may be able to spot them…

Tell me what you find and ill send you a sticker!

Happy Trails.

=D

 

SlingFin is making headlines!

No, its not because of the reports of U.F.O sightings on Gilman St..

The outer shell of a OneUP suspended above the inner tent.

 

 

It’s about L.F.D sightings on Everest!

The L.F.D in Camp 2 (21,300 ft) Photo- Mountain Trip.

“When a team of climbers reached the summit of Mount Everest on Thursday, they had a significant advantage over other teams this spring, many of whom were forced to turn back short of the world’s tallest peak by bad weather.”…..

 

……”Our goal is not to build this business up and sell it off. We’re not a marketing company; we’re a product-driven company that in the long run will translate into relationships with the people who appreciate this gear and will support it. In the short run it will be very challenging, but this is the way to properly brand the business in the long run.” Read the entire article here.

=D

Moonrise over the L.F.D.

Moonrise over the L.F.D @ Camp 2. Photo-Neal Beidleman

We have received many amazing photos from Everest this season, and one thing keeps coming to mind; a large majority of all the tents on this mountain were designed by Martin Zemitis.

Martin has been designing outdoor since he was in high school, and SlingFin is the culmination of the past 30+ years of his experience. The materials in SlingFin tents are not revolutionary;  but the manner in which they are applied most definitely are.

In a way, every shelter he has made was a prototype for our current design model. The proper use of fabrics and materials in the right places, in order to provide the highest level of function and strength for the required conditions.

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The Guides’ Choice.

Inside the L.F.D during the windstorm. Human reinforcement!

It says a lot when a guide chooses a tent on Everest.  This shelter must be  exceptionally strong, after all this space will be your sanctuary when you need it most.  If a hurricane is blowing in the bay of bengal and  the temperature in Camp 2  @ 21,500ft drops to -20f  with gale force winds, the tent you have chosen is not just a structure…  It’s life support.

The L.F.D still standing at Camp 2 after a heavy wind storm.

And this is just what happened at Camp 2 on May 6. A big wind storm kicked up at night and blew fierce in to the morning, reports speak of 50-80 mph winds that devastated 30% of the entire camp. The Mountain Trip team only lost two tents in the ordeal and everybody is doing just fine.

“Just wanted to let you know that the LFD is hanging tough up at Camp 2 (21,500 ft +/-) in 50-80mph winds while other tents are snapping poles.  Scott Woolums is up there today, and said the dome is doing great.  I just came down to base camp yesterday with my crew, after spending the last week up there and really think that the LFD is the best dining tent or dome up at Camp 2.  We really appreciate all the windows, and ventilation options, the big doors, etc.   The biggest concern that we had was how it would do in the wind, and it is standing up to the test right now.  We were able to secure it really well all the way around.  Climbers from other teams stop by regularly to check out the dome and I think they are all jealous.”
-Bill Allen Mountain Trip.

Rows of flattened tents @ 21,500 ft in Camp 2.

This is where the little details become HUGE factors.

SlingFin is the first to use ET70 (titanium dioxide bias binding) on the tent body and perimeter (BFD and LFD). This is an important detail since nylon and polyester bias bindings will degrade much sooner than the rest of the tent which is made of ET70.

All perimeter tie-outs and grommet tabs have a grosgrain reinforcement. This helps to strengthen the tent fabric in high stress areas where the fabric is under excessive tension or areas with bar tacks.

SlingFin tents are equipped with Easton® Expedition grade 7075-T9 tent tube. Easton aluminum tent tube is hard anodized and has the highest yield strength available in the industry.

All stress points are reinforced with extra fabric or grosgrain and sewn with a bar tack or reinforced by back tacking the stress area. Back tacks are most commonly applied to stress areas that would be damaged by a bar tack machine.

These are some of the little details and fine points that separate a thoughtfully designed mountaineering dome from a pile of poles and fabric.

=D

The L.F.D is at Camp 2!

The L.F.D through a fisheye lens. Nothing spells home like A 5 meter dome!

 

Located at 23,000 ft Camp 2 is also known as advanced basecamp, because it serves many of the same duties as the lower camp just smaller. This is exactly why we built the 200 square foot L.F.D.  With ten easton poles and ET70 fabric coated with titanium dioxide, the L.F.D is right at home here, and can withstand these harsh conditions for a very long time.

B.F.D in Everest basecamp with Mountain Trip banner.

 

Reports are that Camp 2 has been getting pummeled with 50-60 mph winds over the past few days,  yet the L.F.D stands strong providing shelter for the group to eat in.

L.F.D at Camp 2. The Mountain Trip boys getting all charged up.

Many thanks to our friends at Mountain Trip for all the great photos and in-depth blog postings!

-Photo Credit– Mountain Trip.