The L.F.D on Broad Peak.

The Altituide Junkies crew have returned from an expedition to Broad Peak.

From the Altitude Junkies blog:

“We have now finally arrived in Base Camp after six long days trekking and will be enjoying some well deserved rest over the next few days while we establish our base camp.

 

For this Broad Peak expedition we are very pleased to be using the LFD dome made by SlingFin as our dinning and communication tent. The guys behind SlingFin, Martin and Tim, are two of the original guys who started Mountain Hardwear so we expect them to be knocking out some awesome tents in the future with the SlingFin product line.

 

After we have base camp established with all our communication and solar equipment set up we will then make plans to start to fix rope to camp one and get some acclimatization rotations in.

 

The above photos show the view of K2 from Broad Peak base camp and our members enjoying lunch in our SlingFin dining dome.

 

-Phil Crampton”

Phil is a well seasoned mountain guide who really knows his stuff, his insights and comments from the field are invaluable to us back at our own base camp in Berkeley.

Thanks for the kudos Phil! We hope to get your team in a B.F.D for the next expedition.

Moonrise over the L.F.D.

Moonrise over the L.F.D @ Camp 2. Photo-Neal Beidleman

We have received many amazing photos from Everest this season, and one thing keeps coming to mind; a large majority of all the tents on this mountain were designed by Martin Zemitis.

Martin has been designing outdoor since he was in high school, and SlingFin is the culmination of the past 30+ years of his experience. The materials in SlingFin tents are not revolutionary;  but the manner in which they are applied most definitely are.

In a way, every shelter he has made was a prototype for our current design model. The proper use of fabrics and materials in the right places, in order to provide the highest level of function and strength for the required conditions.

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A.A.I HAS DONE IT! EVEREST AND LHOTSE DOUBLE SUMMIT!

Alpine Ascents’ website officially reports: At 4:22 am on May 20th 2011, Garrett Madison, Tom Halliday and Kami Rita Sherpa made the summit of Lhotse!

This is a truly amazing feat of mountaineering in all aspects of the sport. The level of skill and sheer endurance that this type of climb requires is possessed by very few people on this earth.

Garett Madision and his Rain-on tech box that allowed him to tweet from the summit of both mountains

CONGRATULATIONS BOYS!

First Image of the One Up on Everest!

Today is a big day for us. The first images of the OneUp nestled in on Everest at 19,800 ft  have come in courtesy of Garrett Madison. The wind has been howling up there pushing gusts of +60 knots over night. Garett and two other guides spent the night in the OneUp with the inner body set up for warmth and extra protection. Reports were that the vent system works great in high winds, allowing for minute changes in the zipper apex in order to control spindrift and airflow. The crew at AAI have been putting the SlingFin systems to the test in some of  the harshest conditions anywhere on earth. We gave Garett a custom Easton Carbon Fiber pole set for this expedition, shaving almost a pound off the total weight of the tent.

We are very happy to provide this level of high-end gear supply to guide services on Everest. We see it as a mutuality beneficial relationship. They get a supply of what may be the finest expedition shelters ever made, and in return they get to beat the living bejezzus out of it, and come back with advice and design ideas that are impossible to test under average conditions.

THE ONEUP IN CAMP 1. LOTSE, NUPTSE AND THE WEST SHOULDER OF EVEREST IN THE BACKGROUND

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The L.F.D is at Camp 2!

The L.F.D through a fisheye lens. Nothing spells home like A 5 meter dome!

 

Located at 23,000 ft Camp 2 is also known as advanced basecamp, because it serves many of the same duties as the lower camp just smaller. This is exactly why we built the 200 square foot L.F.D.  With ten easton poles and ET70 fabric coated with titanium dioxide, the L.F.D is right at home here, and can withstand these harsh conditions for a very long time.

B.F.D in Everest basecamp with Mountain Trip banner.

 

Reports are that Camp 2 has been getting pummeled with 50-60 mph winds over the past few days,  yet the L.F.D stands strong providing shelter for the group to eat in.

L.F.D at Camp 2. The Mountain Trip boys getting all charged up.

Many thanks to our friends at Mountain Trip for all the great photos and in-depth blog postings!

-Photo Credit– Mountain Trip.

 

 

 

 

Everest at night

Photo- Neal Beidleman

BIG THANKS to the Mountain Trip team! These folks are putting SlingFins gear to the test and coming back with fantastic beta, and some amazing photography as well.

The B.F.D @ 17,500 ft Photo- Chris Davenport

There is something very satisfying about seeing the B.F.D. in its rightful place. To see a design go from paper and rulers to an extremely refined structure sitting at 17,500 ft set up as a communication center, or the L.F.D in Camp 2 as a dining tent (21,500 ft) it’s very cool.

From M.T’S Blog: ” Camp 2 is sometimes referred to as “Advanced Base Camp” (ABC) and we supply it to create an essentially smaller version of our base facilities. We have a kitchen tent with 4 Sherpas working hard to keep us fed and camp running smoothly, and a smaller version of our massive SlingFin dome that we’ve set up for our dining tent. The rest of the Sherpa team keep delivering loads of food, fuel, tents, and oxygen up here every couple of days to stage for the upper mountain. This morning they showed up with a dog following them. The dog crossed all the ladders with ease apparently… We’ll try to track down a photo of the dog on the ladder and post it later.” I will definitely stay tuned to see a shot of that dog on an ice ladder!

The L.F.D in Camp 2 (21,300 ft) Photo- Mountain Trip.

 

Chris Davenport is one of the members of the Mountain Trip team. He just wrote a new book; Fifty Classic Ski Descents of North America. And from the looks of the above photo this guy is truly hooked on skiing. He is also the one taking some of the sweet night shots.

B.F.D at night -- Photo- Chris Davenport

Photo- Neal Beidleman

Photo- Neal Beidleman

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Sushi on Everest!

Our friends at MT have been honing their skills in preparation for the trip to the top.

Big thanks to laurie! Not only did she haul a L.F.D from the states to Basecamp, but she brought sushi too!

Life at basecamp seems like a lot of fun! They will have puja to bless the expedition and pay homage to the mighty mountain.

Everest and Lhotse in 24 hours!

The gang over at Alpine Ascents International have set out on a truly epic mission. If I told you that I was plannining on climbing to the summit of the tallest mountain in the world, heading back to camp 4 resting for a bit, and then continuing on to the summit of the 4th highest peak, you would say I was crazy.

And you would be right.

But when a well rounded and fully pollished mountain guide like Garrett Madison takes on such a challenge, people sit up and take notice and a very select few raise their hands and get in line.

This is a quote from Garrett’s totally awesome blog:

We will begin our trek up the Khumbu Valley at the end of March, and reach Everest Base Camp around mid April.  We will train at base camp reviewing our technical climbing skills for about a week, then make our first trip up the mountain.  Our first “rotation” will include climbing through the Khumbu Icefall to Camp 1 where we will spend a few nights, then on to Camp 2 for a few nights, then back to Base Camp where we will rest & recover.  We will then head up for our second “rotation” where we plan to climb to camps 1, 2, then 3 and spend a night at 3, then back to Base Camp.  Usually at this time we drop down valley a few nights to rest and recover where the air is thicker.  After a few days rest we head back up to Everest Base Camp.  Our third “rotation” will include an attempt at the summit of Everest, and for some of our climbers, an attempt at Lhotse (4th highest mountain) as well.
The plan for our “third” rotation is to climb to Camps 1,2,3, then 4.  After reaching the South Col high camp (Camp 4), we will rest 24 hours then depart in the evening with the expectation of reaching Everest’s summit the next morning.  We then plan to return to our high camp around noon that day.  The climbers who are planning to attempt Lhotse will rest that afternoon & evening, then depart late that night and descend from the South Col to Lhotse high camp, where they will hopefully ascend the prominent couloir to the summit of Lhotse sometime that morning, then descend down to Camp 2.  The other climbers who have climbed Everest but who are not attempting Lhotse will descend that day to Camp 2 as well (after sleeping that night at the South Col high camp).
Recap:  We hope to safely climb to the summit of Mt. Everest, and then a few of our climbers will try to reach the summit of Lhotse (4th highest mountain) about 24 hours later.  We have made preparations & will continue to stay focused to maximize our chances of success for this “Peak to Peak” adventure.  As always, safety is our number 1 priority! “.
-Garrett Madison Expedition Leader.
I have to admit that I’m alittle addicited to garretts blog. It’s great!
He has a google earth plugin with the whole route mapped, altitude tracker and good photography.
We have a tremendous amount of faith in the ability of this team to carry out this mission in a safe and efficient manner. We wish them the best!
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