International Peace Climb

Tomorrow evening the 25th anniversary of the International Peace Climb will be celebrated in Seattle, WA. In 1990, when most of the world was at odds with each other, a group of people from the United States, Russia, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Belarus, and China took it upon themselves to make a statement. A statement made by having the most successful summit of Mt. Everest, with a total of 20 people from the group reaching the summit over several days. Proving that a group of people from different countries could work together as one with a common goal.

The message, however, was not just that they could summit a mountain together. Rather, they were also making an environmental statement. The timeline they had for summiting coincided with the 20th anniversary from the first Earth Day. They wanted to bring awareness to the fact that we need to work together to take care of the planet we live on and demonstrated this by clearing over two tons of garbage from the mountain. Expedition leader, Jim Whittaker, said, “When our team left Base Camp, you couldn’t tell another human had been there.”

One of SlingFin’s own was honored enough to have been a part of this historic event and will also be in attendance. Robert Link, a lifelong mountaineer, was one of the 20 people of that expedition to summit Everest. Link has summited Mt. Rainier over 300 times and climbed extensively around the world.

As well as this being a reunion for the members of that original group, this gathering is also being held in hopes to once again raise awareness that it is time to join forces and start addressing the issues that the earth is facing.

“We’ve invited the leaders of our countries to talk to the team on Mt. Rainier—just like they spoke to us on Mt. Everest in 1990,” said Whittaker. “Presidents (H.W.) Bush, Gorbachev and Li Peng all called us—we had one of the very first satellite phones. They sent said that working on behalf of world peace and a clean environment was the most important thing we would ever do. It would be great to hear the same message from today’s leaders!”

All attending members of the team will travel together from Seattle to Mt. Rainier National Park. This is where they first met and trained for Everest in 1989. An official ceremony will be held at the mountain on the United Nations International Day of Peace, September 21st, followed by an anniversary celebration dinner in Paradise Lodge.

The following is information obtained from a press release Mr. Whittaker’s office sent out:

The public is invited to two special events, with slide shows by the team and a screening of the video about the 1990 climb, “Three Flags Over Everest,” narrated by Robert Redford.

The first is on Thursday, September 17 at 7:00 PM, at The Mountaineers Program Center, 7700 Sand Point Way, Seattle WA. Tickets are $20 for adults and $10 for students and children, and may be purchased in advance at The Mountaineers. Advance purchase is encouraged, as seating is limited. All proceeds benefit The Mountaineers conservation and youth programs.

The second is a free event on Sunday, September 20 at 8:30 PM, in the lobby of Paradise Lodge, in Mount Rainier National Park. Seating is limited and is first-come, first-served.

MOUNTAIN TRIP IS ON TOP OF THE WORLD!

Ephi just waiting to get into his tent

Thanks to the strong and experienced guides at Mountain Trip, they had a 100% summit success!

All the comforts of home in our big dome! Laurie brings sushi to base camp.

 

And what from what i’ve seen from the crew so far, this group does it right. Sushi at base camp? Labatts beer at Camp 3 @24,500ft ?  Days of extras oxygen at Camp 4? Sounds like Mountain Trip pulls out all the stops for their clients, add to that guides like Scott Woolums and Bill Allen who have spent more nights in the back country than an alaskan bear cub, and you have a recipe for a solid expedition team.

The Guides’ Choice.

Inside the L.F.D during the windstorm. Human reinforcement!

It says a lot when a guide chooses a tent on Everest.  This shelter must be  exceptionally strong, after all this space will be your sanctuary when you need it most.  If a hurricane is blowing in the bay of bengal and  the temperature in Camp 2  @ 21,500ft drops to -20f  with gale force winds, the tent you have chosen is not just a structure…  It’s life support.

The L.F.D still standing at Camp 2 after a heavy wind storm.

And this is just what happened at Camp 2 on May 6. A big wind storm kicked up at night and blew fierce in to the morning, reports speak of 50-80 mph winds that devastated 30% of the entire camp. The Mountain Trip team only lost two tents in the ordeal and everybody is doing just fine.

“Just wanted to let you know that the LFD is hanging tough up at Camp 2 (21,500 ft +/-) in 50-80mph winds while other tents are snapping poles.  Scott Woolums is up there today, and said the dome is doing great.  I just came down to base camp yesterday with my crew, after spending the last week up there and really think that the LFD is the best dining tent or dome up at Camp 2.  We really appreciate all the windows, and ventilation options, the big doors, etc.   The biggest concern that we had was how it would do in the wind, and it is standing up to the test right now.  We were able to secure it really well all the way around.  Climbers from other teams stop by regularly to check out the dome and I think they are all jealous.”
-Bill Allen Mountain Trip.

Rows of flattened tents @ 21,500 ft in Camp 2.

This is where the little details become HUGE factors.

SlingFin is the first to use ET70 (titanium dioxide bias binding) on the tent body and perimeter (BFD and LFD). This is an important detail since nylon and polyester bias bindings will degrade much sooner than the rest of the tent which is made of ET70.

All perimeter tie-outs and grommet tabs have a grosgrain reinforcement. This helps to strengthen the tent fabric in high stress areas where the fabric is under excessive tension or areas with bar tacks.

SlingFin tents are equipped with Easton® Expedition grade 7075-T9 tent tube. Easton aluminum tent tube is hard anodized and has the highest yield strength available in the industry.

All stress points are reinforced with extra fabric or grosgrain and sewn with a bar tack or reinforced by back tacking the stress area. Back tacks are most commonly applied to stress areas that would be damaged by a bar tack machine.

These are some of the little details and fine points that separate a thoughtfully designed mountaineering dome from a pile of poles and fabric.

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First Image of the One Up on Everest!

Today is a big day for us. The first images of the OneUp nestled in on Everest at 19,800 ft  have come in courtesy of Garrett Madison. The wind has been howling up there pushing gusts of +60 knots over night. Garett and two other guides spent the night in the OneUp with the inner body set up for warmth and extra protection. Reports were that the vent system works great in high winds, allowing for minute changes in the zipper apex in order to control spindrift and airflow. The crew at AAI have been putting the SlingFin systems to the test in some of  the harshest conditions anywhere on earth. We gave Garett a custom Easton Carbon Fiber pole set for this expedition, shaving almost a pound off the total weight of the tent.

We are very happy to provide this level of high-end gear supply to guide services on Everest. We see it as a mutuality beneficial relationship. They get a supply of what may be the finest expedition shelters ever made, and in return they get to beat the living bejezzus out of it, and come back with advice and design ideas that are impossible to test under average conditions.

THE ONEUP IN CAMP 1. LOTSE, NUPTSE AND THE WEST SHOULDER OF EVEREST IN THE BACKGROUND

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The L.F.D is at Camp 2!

The L.F.D through a fisheye lens. Nothing spells home like A 5 meter dome!

 

Located at 23,000 ft Camp 2 is also known as advanced basecamp, because it serves many of the same duties as the lower camp just smaller. This is exactly why we built the 200 square foot L.F.D.  With ten easton poles and ET70 fabric coated with titanium dioxide, the L.F.D is right at home here, and can withstand these harsh conditions for a very long time.

B.F.D in Everest basecamp with Mountain Trip banner.

 

Reports are that Camp 2 has been getting pummeled with 50-60 mph winds over the past few days,  yet the L.F.D stands strong providing shelter for the group to eat in.

L.F.D at Camp 2. The Mountain Trip boys getting all charged up.

Many thanks to our friends at Mountain Trip for all the great photos and in-depth blog postings!

-Photo Credit– Mountain Trip.

 

 

 

 

Everest at night

Photo- Neal Beidleman

BIG THANKS to the Mountain Trip team! These folks are putting SlingFins gear to the test and coming back with fantastic beta, and some amazing photography as well.

The B.F.D @ 17,500 ft Photo- Chris Davenport

There is something very satisfying about seeing the B.F.D. in its rightful place. To see a design go from paper and rulers to an extremely refined structure sitting at 17,500 ft set up as a communication center, or the L.F.D in Camp 2 as a dining tent (21,500 ft) it’s very cool.

From M.T’S Blog: ” Camp 2 is sometimes referred to as “Advanced Base Camp” (ABC) and we supply it to create an essentially smaller version of our base facilities. We have a kitchen tent with 4 Sherpas working hard to keep us fed and camp running smoothly, and a smaller version of our massive SlingFin dome that we’ve set up for our dining tent. The rest of the Sherpa team keep delivering loads of food, fuel, tents, and oxygen up here every couple of days to stage for the upper mountain. This morning they showed up with a dog following them. The dog crossed all the ladders with ease apparently… We’ll try to track down a photo of the dog on the ladder and post it later.” I will definitely stay tuned to see a shot of that dog on an ice ladder!

The L.F.D in Camp 2 (21,300 ft) Photo- Mountain Trip.

 

Chris Davenport is one of the members of the Mountain Trip team. He just wrote a new book; Fifty Classic Ski Descents of North America. And from the looks of the above photo this guy is truly hooked on skiing. He is also the one taking some of the sweet night shots.

B.F.D at night -- Photo- Chris Davenport

Photo- Neal Beidleman

Photo- Neal Beidleman

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Sushi on Everest!

Our friends at MT have been honing their skills in preparation for the trip to the top.

Big thanks to laurie! Not only did she haul a L.F.D from the states to Basecamp, but she brought sushi too!

Life at basecamp seems like a lot of fun! They will have puja to bless the expedition and pay homage to the mighty mountain.

Everest and Lhotse in 24 hours!

The gang over at Alpine Ascents International have set out on a truly epic mission. If I told you that I was plannining on climbing to the summit of the tallest mountain in the world, heading back to camp 4 resting for a bit, and then continuing on to the summit of the 4th highest peak, you would say I was crazy.

And you would be right.

But when a well rounded and fully pollished mountain guide like Garrett Madison takes on such a challenge, people sit up and take notice and a very select few raise their hands and get in line.

This is a quote from Garrett’s totally awesome blog:

We will begin our trek up the Khumbu Valley at the end of March, and reach Everest Base Camp around mid April.  We will train at base camp reviewing our technical climbing skills for about a week, then make our first trip up the mountain.  Our first “rotation” will include climbing through the Khumbu Icefall to Camp 1 where we will spend a few nights, then on to Camp 2 for a few nights, then back to Base Camp where we will rest & recover.  We will then head up for our second “rotation” where we plan to climb to camps 1, 2, then 3 and spend a night at 3, then back to Base Camp.  Usually at this time we drop down valley a few nights to rest and recover where the air is thicker.  After a few days rest we head back up to Everest Base Camp.  Our third “rotation” will include an attempt at the summit of Everest, and for some of our climbers, an attempt at Lhotse (4th highest mountain) as well.
The plan for our “third” rotation is to climb to Camps 1,2,3, then 4.  After reaching the South Col high camp (Camp 4), we will rest 24 hours then depart in the evening with the expectation of reaching Everest’s summit the next morning.  We then plan to return to our high camp around noon that day.  The climbers who are planning to attempt Lhotse will rest that afternoon & evening, then depart late that night and descend from the South Col to Lhotse high camp, where they will hopefully ascend the prominent couloir to the summit of Lhotse sometime that morning, then descend down to Camp 2.  The other climbers who have climbed Everest but who are not attempting Lhotse will descend that day to Camp 2 as well (after sleeping that night at the South Col high camp).
Recap:  We hope to safely climb to the summit of Mt. Everest, and then a few of our climbers will try to reach the summit of Lhotse (4th highest mountain) about 24 hours later.  We have made preparations & will continue to stay focused to maximize our chances of success for this “Peak to Peak” adventure.  As always, safety is our number 1 priority! “.
-Garrett Madison Expedition Leader.
I have to admit that I’m alittle addicited to garretts blog. It’s great!
He has a google earth plugin with the whole route mapped, altitude tracker and good photography.
We have a tremendous amount of faith in the ability of this team to carry out this mission in a safe and efficient manner. We wish them the best!
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B.F.D in E.B.C!

Welcome to Everest!

The B.F.D standing strong!

The crew at Mountain Trip have been working hard setting up a stout and luxurious basecamp! The B.F.D will be main meeting place for the team while in EBC, and will be the “dome away from home” for the basecamp managers over the next six weeks! It safely houses a staggering array satellite phones, solar power cells, batteries, laptops, BGAN and other communication equipment. In addition to this  it will be the dining tent for 20+ people.

A crowd of sherpas gather to see what all the buzz is about.

 

As the team moves higher on the mountain the group shelters need to adapt to the conditions and become smaller, lighter, stronger! Enter the OneUp…

The OneUp is the most functional tent in our line, main goal of this structure is to be hyper versatile.  Think of the Webtruss as an exoskeleton that can adapt to your needs.MMMM... spacious...

The OneUp with four chairs!-Photo-Jackie Moore

Say the weather is pounding and your group needs shelter : Just stretch the fly over the frame and you have a massive “single wall” floorless tent that will fit 5-6 people with room to spare!   After your meal, reattach the inner tent body and you have a fully enclosed “double wall” bomb shelter that will sleep 2-3, with two huge freestanding vestibules.  This is what the OneUp will be used for in Camp-2.

OneUp with floor.

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